Connecting Voluntās Policy Advisory Projects with SDGs

Connecting Voluntās Policy Advisory Projects with SDGs

Connecting Voluntās Policy Advisory Projects with SDGs

Article | Policy Advisory

Mapping the meaningful impact of our work

The idiom ‘Don’t miss the forest for the trees’ serves as a reminder that while individual actions have their respective impact, meaningfulness is derived from the way actions work in tandem to contribute to a bigger picture.

At Voluntās Policy Advisory, we understand that larger goals, the forest, are actualized and composed by individual actions, the trees. We conceptualize our work not only in its respective impact, the trees, but we recognize how everything is connected and contextualize our work within the wider ecosystem of policymaking, the forest.

In pursuit of looking at the bigger picture, we are developing a methodology for parsing out and mapping the ways in which our work contributes to sustainable development goals (SDGs). This challenges us to think critically about how resources are allocated, allowing us to recognize the direct impact and meaningfulness of our work on global goals.

For example, projects that aim to restore infrastructure directly contribute to SDG 9: Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure. From there, we track expenditures that directly contribute to projects’ infrastructural activities, outlining the allocation of expenditures per SDG as shown in the figure below.

By mapping the connection between projects and SDGs we become privy to a more comprehensive perspective and understanding of how our actions and activities contribute to the overall meaningfulness of our work.

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Meaningful work lowers the impact of work-related stress on employees’ well-being

Meaningful work lowers the impact of work-related stress on employees’ well-being

Meaningful work lowers the impact of work-related stress on employees’ well-being

Experiencing meaning in life is widely acknowledged to have a positive impact on well-being. Worryingly, work-related stress has been shown to lower the presence of meaning in life experienced by employees, which lowers their well-being. One study dove deeper into the relationship between work-related stress and employees’ sense of meaning in life and found that meaningful work moderates some of the harmful effects of work stress.

The study found that through meaning-making – allowing an individual to make sense of events – meaningful work significantly reduces the impact that work stress has on a person’s experience of meaning in life, and thus their well-being. That means that the well-being of individuals who experience a high meaningfulness at work is less affected by work-related stress, than that of their peers with a lower sense of meaningfulness.

All in all, this study is a promising sign that increasing meaningfulness at work helps employees to cope with stress. However, this does not take away the need for leaders to focus on lowering work stress, and further research is needed to confirm the findings of this study.

Read the research article on the subject here: ‘Meaningful Work as a Moderator of the Relation Between Work Stress and Meaning in Life.’ 

 

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